Essays on condemnation

A husband’s absence could give new importance to his portrait. The identity of the woman who holds her husband’s likeness in Licinio’s picture is unknown, and her wan expression is a bit wistful and remote. The other picture is quite different. Raphael painted his friend, wealthy Florentine banker Bindo Altoviti, in an almost theatrical pose. He turns to fix the eye of the viewer, and Bindo perhaps intended his portrait to connect with one viewer in particular: his wife, Fiammetta Soderini. Bindo’s flushed cheeks contribute to the impression of passion, and a ring is prominent on the hand he holds above his heart. Bindo and Fiammetta, the daughter of a prominent Florentine family, were married in 1511, when Bindo would have been about twenty years old. The couple went on to have six children, but Fiammetta continued to live in Florence while Bindo’s business with the papal court required his presence in Rome. This portrait, which apparently hung in the couple’s home in Florence, would have provided Fiammetta with a vivid reminder of her absent husband. It remained in the Altoviti family for nearly three hundred years.

Cleopatra's sexuality, despite condemnation by the patriarchal men - she is referred to as 'strumpet' and 'whore' on various occasions throughout the play - is unhidden and unrestricted. Her sexual power over men is conveyed boldly, for example, in her descriptions of her former conquests 'great Pompey' and 'Broad-fronted Caesar'. Cleopatra's sexuality is not a thing to be locked up, as in Hamlet and Othello , but is celebrated as a positive force. Surprisingly, even Enobarbus, despite his patriarchal views, does on occasions present her as positively sexual, as his unforgettable description of her indicates:

Evergreen reopened its broken, vandalized doors on Tuesday to a world finally awakened to the deadly seriousness of campus fascism. Prior to going quiet after receiving mass-murder threats, Weinstein wrote an editorial in the Wall Street Journal warning: “The Campus Mob Came for Me—and You, Professor, Could Be Next.” There have been many others before him, before and since illiberal witch hunts ran Erika and Nicholas Christakis off of Yale’s campus two years ago, and this latest installment could have gone unnoticed by the nothing-to-see-here establishment. But finally, the New York Times has found a mob victim sympathetic enough in Weinstein, a liberal professor, to publicly lambaste the mobs at Evergreen, who counter every question, comment, and even a hand gesture by shouting, “RACIST.”

Essays on condemnation

essays on condemnation

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